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Dreadnought Story

Chapter 6: The Big Guitar Boom

The late 1960s may have witnessed the end of one era for the Martin Company, but their last few products of that decade ushered in the ensuing "high production `70s" with a surprise. In 1968, after 26 years, the famous D-45 surfaced again. Martin Historian Mike Longworth deserves more than a little credit for reintroducing this product.

When Longworth went to work for the Martin Company, he brought with him the knowledge of how to do the pearl work necessary for the fanciest production Martin guitar. Working on his own, Longworth actually "converted" several D-28s by retrofitting them with all of the pearl bordering found on the old D-45s. This was no attempt to deceive, but flattery of the highest regard. 230 D-45s were made with Brazilian rosewood in the late `60s before the switch to Indian rosewood.

A totally new model was introduced in 1969 to fill the gap between the D-35 and the new D-45: the D-41. This instrument featured pearl borders around the top only, as opposed to the all-encompassing borders on the more expensive D-45. Thirty-one D-41s, starting with #252014, were made with Brazilian rosewood; all the rest are constructed of Indian rosewood.

With the tremendous interest in acoustic guitars in the early 1970s (which coincided exactly with the new "soft-rock" era of James Taylor, Loggins & Messina, and Seals & Crofts), the Martin company increased production to an unprecedented rate. As a comparison, in 1961 the company made 507 D-28s; in 1971 the total was 5,466. The company offered five different Dreadnoughts (as well as numerous smaller-sized guitars) to a market that seemed to grow every month.

To meet the ever-increasing demand, Martin chose to build up its staff rather than change production procedures, which still primarily required hand work. Martin reached its peak production in 1971, but didn't hit its peak Dreadnought production years until 1974 and 1975. Over 30,000 Dreadnoughts were produced in this two year period. (1974: 3,811 D-18s; 5077 D-28s; 6,184 D-35s; 506 D-41s; 157 D-45s. 1975: 3,069 D-18s; 4,996 D-28s; 6,260 D-35s; 452 D-41s; and 192 D-45s [does not include "S" models].)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: The Dreadnought Story
Chapter 2: From the Beginning
Chapter 3: The First D-45
Chapter 4: Mid-`40s to the Mid-`60s
Chapter 5: The Tumultuous Mid-`60s
Chapter 6: The Big Guitar Boom
Chapter 7: Other Models
Chapter 8: Approaching 2000 & Beyond

Chapter 7: Other Models

As a result of the phenomenal growth in acoustic guitar sales during this period and the subsequent slowdown, the Martin Company began an aggressive research and development phase which brought no fewer than nine new Dreadnought models into production by 1980. It’s difficult to single out one model for consideration, but the HD–28 represented an interesting glimpse back, while all of the rest were new ideas.

Introduced in 1976, the HD–28 was a conscious effort to remake a guitar from the past–the prewar herringbone D–28. Like the early Dreadnoughts, it featured scalloped top braces, a small maple bridge plate, and herringbone marquetry around the top. This bow to the past has proven to be a very popular model. After the success of the HD–28, the HD–35 (a D–35 with scalloped braces, maple bridge plate, and herringbone trim) was introduced in 1978.

A singular effort was the Bicentennial commemorative D–76, featuring a three–piece back, style 28 body trim, pearl stars in the fingerboard, a pearl eagle in the peghead, and two herringbone back strips. It had a limited production of 1,976 guitars (plus an additional 98 employee instruments). The D–76, which began production in 1975, was not a hot seller; it didn’t sell out until 1978.

Yet another eye–catching series of guitars was produced, made out of Hawaiian koa wood. This was not the first time the Martin Company used this tropical hardwood, but these were the first Dreadnoughts using koa. Two basic styles came in two optional models each. The D–25K had a spruce top, two–piece koa back and sides, rosewood fretboard and bridge, and black binding; the optional koa top changed the designation to D–25K2. The D–37K came with figured two–piece koa back and sides, spruce top, ebony fretboard and bridge, white binding, and fancier inlay; the koa top option was the D–37K2.

Two other instruments were introduced to fit between the D–18 and the D–28. The D–19 was a D–18 with a stained top (brown to match the sides and back). It was followed by the D–19M which was a D–18 with a mahogany top.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: The Dreadnought Story
Chapter 2: From the Beginning
Chapter 3: The First D-45
Chapter 4: Mid-`40s to the Mid-`60s
Chapter 5: The Tumultuous Mid-`60s
Chapter 6: The Big Guitar Boom
Chapter 7: Other Models
Chapter 8: Approaching 2000 & Beyond

Dreadnought

Optimized-Dreadnought

Named after the largest battleship of the time, the Dreadnought Guitar by C.F. Martin evolved in the early 1930s and quickly became one of the most popular instruments worldwide. John Deichman was the Martin Guitar shop foreman and an avid guitar player who worked to design this 'boat' of an acoustic guitar.

The Dreadnought is a 12-fret guitar with bass-like qualities and deep resonating sound that incorporate a low-end response. Learn more about the dreadnought story and you'll start to understand why fans like the size and sounds that come from this beautifully crafted instrument. Over the years, fans of C.F. Martin have continually chosen the Dreadnought as their guitar of choice, earning the instrument several Player's Choice Awards, including the gold for several years:

Acoustic Guitar Players Choice Awards

 

2000

               Dreadnought Gold: C.F. Martin

2006

              Dreadnought Gold: C.F. Martin

2011

               Dreadnought Gold: C.F. Martin

2014

               Dreadnought Gold: C.F. Martin

 

Chapter 8: Approaching 2000 & Beyond

Now, as the company approaches the next century, after nearly 70 years of constant production, the Martin Dreadnought guitar is available in the standard production models, in an assortment of vintage inspired recreations, in the newly patented, economically priced "X Series" and "16 Series" models, in the occasional "Limited Edition," or even as a customized "dream guitar."

The Limited Edition Dreadnoughts have taken a variety of forms. Martin has released historically accurate reproductions of mid–’30s D–28s– complete with "high X–braces," Brazilian rosewood, V–shaped neck, tortoiseshell colored pickguard, "ivoroid" binding, and all the other features found on a normal HD–28. The company also has experimented with materials new to them, like maple, as in the Limited Edition D–62.

Other one–time offerings have included a relatively inexpensive koa Dreadnought, followed soon after by a string of the fanciest Martin Dreadnoughts ever seen. The 1987 D–45LE with a price tag of $7,500 was designed by C. F. Martin IV, current Chairman and CEO of the company. This model set the stage for future D–45 Deluxe models, including two C. F. Martin, Sr. Commemorative 1996 editions which featured pearl borders nearly everywhere, specially selected rosewood, period inlays, and gold tuning machines. In 1994, Martin issued a recreation of Gene Autry’s famous 12–fret D–45 which bore a retail price of $23,000. A 1996 collaboration with "MTV Unplugged" yielded a highly unusual Dreadnought that mixed both rosewood and mahogany tonewoods with MTV conceived inlay patterns.

One drawback of some Limited Edition instruments is that at times they are available on such a limited basis that potential customers aren’t even aware of their existence until it’s too late.

At the same time, a customer has the ultimate freedom of designing his or her own "limited edition" guitar. Martin’s customized Dreadnoughts are not really a new option–in 1934, singer Tex Fletcher special–ordered the only D–42 ever made, a left–handed instrument. But since 1983, Martin has solicited custom work on a regular basis.

With all these options, and the quickly changing Martin offerings, this is an exciting and occasionally confusing time for Martin fans. But like quality automobiles and fine pianos, Martin Dreadnoughts, new and old, continue to command considerable respect, and likely will for many years to come.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: The Dreadnought Story
Chapter 2: From the Beginning
Chapter 3: The First D-45
Chapter 4: Mid-`40s to the Mid-`60s
Chapter 5: The Tumultuous Mid-`60s
Chapter 6: The Big Guitar Boom
Chapter 7: Other Models
Chapter 8: Approaching 2000 & Beyond

 
 
 
 
 
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